U.s. Australia Free Trade Agreement

· The United States and Australia will work to remove health and plant protection barriers to agricultural trade, particularly pork, citrus, apples and stone-based fruit On July 15, both houses of the U.S. Congress strongly supported the free trade agreement. The agreement was also supported by Democratic Party presidential candidate John Kerry. This chapter defines the framework of the free trade agreement. It states that the provisions are in line with the relevant sections of the 1994 General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and the General Agreement on Trade in Services (GATS). Both GATT and GATS are documents created by World Trade Organization (WTO) agreements that set limits on future bilateral agreements such as the United States of Australia. Free trade agreement. Following the signing of the free trade agreement, there was initial talk that the U.S. agricultural sector would put pressure on the agreement, fearing that it would interfere with the government`s agricultural subsidy program.

However, the agreement with deadlines for importing Australian agricultural products, such as beef and sugar cane, has allayed concerns in the US agricultural market (while many Australian producers were very frustrated). Concern over the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme has led to speculation that the U.S. side will make a strong commitment to repeal as part of a free trade agreement. The government has been criticized, particularly by The Australian Democrats and Greens, for not doing enough to protect the operations of the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, which the government has vigorously disputed. Some scientists (such as Thomas Alured Faunce) have argued that the provisions of the agreement would lead to higher prices for PBS-based drugs. However, the text in question was limited to procedure and transparency and contained no provision that could influence the price, which ultimately did not. In this section, it was agreed on the conditions of fair trade between telecommunications industries in different countries. In particular, the rules exclude measures relating to the transmission or cable distribution of radio or television programmes.